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Track Work Begins at the Museum's Frisco Site!

Track construction at the Museum of the American Railroad’s Frisco site has begun!  Workers with Trac-Work, Inc. began placing new crossties on the westernmost end of what will become the Museum’s tail track.  The first 300 feet of track material was put in place today as part of a 4,000 foot Phase IA track construction project. 

Construction will progress in a northeast direction through the Museum site and eventually connect with BNSF’s main line to the north of Cotton Gin Road.  Five turnouts (switches) will be constructed in place, along with the Museum’s runaround track.  Work is expected to take 30-40 days, weather permitting. 

While the ties are new, the rail is being recycled from the Santa Fe (originally Kansas City, Mexico & Orient) Line near San Angelo, Texas.  The rail was produced by Colorado Fuel & Iron mills in Pueblo, and the Gary Steel Works near Chicago between 1918 and 1920.  Weighing 90 lbs/yard (a unit of measurement for rail), the 39-foot sections will be bolted in place as track work progresses.  The Museum’s rolling stock collection currently rests on 65-85 lb rail at Fair Park.  Today’s industry standard for mainline railroads is 130-150 lbs/yard.  

For updates on construction at the Frisco site, click here.

The Museum of the American Railroad is a 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit Texas Corporation dedicated to preserving the heritage and exploring the future of railroads through historic preservation, research, and educational programming.  Since 1963, the Museum has engaged in collecting artifacts and archival material from the railroad industry for the purpose of preserving, exhibiting, and interpreting their significance in American life and culture.   Educational programs are available to local schools and universities through study trips, in-class programming & outreach, and online resources at:  www.HistoricTrains.org

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